Roof Repair Service

Storm damage can ruin the roof of your home and leave it in a state of disrepair. In this article, we’ll discuss the signs of storm damage to your roof and how to find a reliable storm damage roof repair service. Next, we’ll talk about finding a reputable contractor who can handle your insurance claim. In addition, you’ll learn how to handle your storm damage insurance claim. After reading this article, you’ll be well on your way to getting the roof of your home fixed.

Storm Damage Roof Repair

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Having a damaged roof can be a scary experience for any homeowner, but the first thing you should do is stay calm. Rather than panicking, you should start the storm damage roof repair process right away. The sooner you start, the better, and the sooner you can expect to see the damage repaired, the less inconvenience you’ll have in the future. Check for any damages immediately, then contact your insurance company and contractor. If the damage is too extensive to assess right away, the contractor will likely not send help until the storm has passed.

During a storm, the roof can sustain damage to the exterior materials, such as wood and metal. A damaged roof can also be perforated by objects that were blown onto it. It’s important to immediately contact a storm damage roof repair service, since the repairs could be more expensive if you wait a day or two. Regardless of who you choose to repair the roof, you can check for signs of storm damage by using binoculars or other tools.

Signs Of Storm Damage On Roof

It may not be immediately obvious that your roof has been damaged by storms, but signs of the damage can include cracked tiles, dents, and leaking seams. Check for damaged flashing around chimneys and vent pipes, too. If your roof has sustained damage, shingles may be missing or rotten. Water stains on walls and ceilings are also a sign of roof system compromise. If you notice any of these signs, consult a roofing professional for assistance.

Another sign of storm damage on roof is the appearance of debris. Debris from storms can strike the roof and blow to other parts of the house. Look for dents, cracks, and broken shingle patterns. If you’re not comfortable climbing on the roof, hire a roofer to inspect it. It is best to take pictures of the damage, as well. After all, you don’t want to risk falling through a hole and hurting yourself.

Signs Of Ice Dams On Shingled Roofs

Even if ice dams don’t damage a shingled roof immediately, they can do extensive damage over time. Not only can they lift or tear shingles, but they also cause the underlayment to buckle and break, which allows water to enter. Over time, this water damage can cause significant damage to the interior of the home, including warped floors and stained ceilings. Ice dams can also result in soggy insulation in the attic, which can lose its R-value and become a breeding ground for mold.

The first sign of ice-dam problems is a collection of icicles around the roof edge. This means ice-dammed snow is accumulating and is preventing water from flowing off the roof. If the ice-dam has formed, you can safely remove it from the roof, preventing further problems. You can also use a calcium-chloride ice-Melter to melt the ice dam and prevent any further damage.

Finding A Reliable Contractor To Handle Insurance Claim

Storm damage contractors often pull tricks on homeowners, trying to talk them out of making claims or underbid them. They may even offer to climb on the roof for free, so be careful and ask to see what damage they found. It might be obvious, but some contractors will try to lure homeowners with low quotes and then demand hundreds of dollars more in repair costs due to unforeseen circumstances. You need a reliable storm damage repair contractor with good reviews and a BBB rating.

When you need repairs to your shingles, contact your insurance company and local roof repair contractors to assess the damage. You can have your insurance company’s adjusters review their estimate before you make a decision. Insurance adjusters know this and aren’t likely to trust contractors who don’t inspect their own homes. Besides, storm chasers might not be trained and aren’t reputable.

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